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What type of Lupus do I have?

Updated: Apr 18

Lupus, a complex autoimmune condition, manifests in various forms, each with its own set of characteristics and challenges.





Follow the questionnaire below to figure out what type of Lupus you have ...


Is your only symptom skin rashes?

  1. Yes - you likely have a type of Cutaneous Lupus - Lupus affecting the skin (this includes subacute cutaneous and discoid Lupus)

  2. No, I have other symptoms - you may have systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) - see below for more information.

  • Both types of Cutaneous Lupus can include other symptoms and may change into systemic lupus over time - keep track of any changes in how you feel and any new symptoms.


Are your skin rashes like coin shaped scaly rashes?

  1. Yes - you may have a sub-type of cutaneous Lupus called Discoid Lupus

  2. No, I have other symptoms like joint pain, fevers, and changes in my bloodwork - you may have systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) - see below for more information.

  • Discoid and Cutaneous Lupus can include other symptoms and may change into systemic lupus over time - keep track of any changes in how you feel and any new symptoms.


Have you started a new medication lately?

  1. Yes - check with your pharmacist to see if it can cause drug-induced Lupus

  2. No - see other questions!


Are you a baby?

  1. Yes - you may have neonatal Lupus

  2. No - You are likely to have the other types of Lupus


  1. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE): Systemic Lupus Erythematosus is the most prevalent and well-known form of lupus. It is a systemic autoimmune disease that can affect multiple organs and systems in the body. From skin rashes to joint pain and internal organ inflammation, SLE presents a diverse range of symptoms that can vary in intensity.

  2. Discoid Lupus Erythematosus (DLE): Discoid Lupus primarily affects the skin, presenting as coin-shaped, scaly rashes, commonly found on the face, scalp, and ears. While DLE primarily impacts the skin, a small percentage of individuals with discoid lupus may later develop systemic symptoms.

  3. Subacute Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus (SCLE): SCLE primarily targets the skin, manifesting as non-scarring, photosensitive rashes. Unlike the discoid form, SCLE typically spares the face and presents on areas exposed to sunlight. Individuals with SCLE may experience joint pain and fatigue, aligning with systemic lupus symptoms.

  4. Drug-Induced Lupus Erythematosus: Certain medications can trigger lupus-like symptoms in susceptible individuals. While the symptoms usually resolve once the medication is discontinued, drug-induced lupus can mimic systemic lupus symptoms, such as joint pain, fever, and skin rashes.

  5. Neonatal Lupus: Neonatal lupus is a rare condition that affects infants born to mothers with specific lupus antibodies. While the mother may not exhibit symptoms, the newborn may experience skin rashes, liver problems, or, in severe cases, congenital heart block. It's crucial for expectant mothers with lupus to collaborate closely with their healthcare team to manage the risks associated with neonatal lupus.


By understanding the different types of lupus, individuals and their healthcare providers can navigate the complexities of this autoimmune condition more effectively.


While Lupus can be a challenging condition to live with, it can be a part of your life and not take over your life. With proper medical care, a strong support system, and focus on self-care with diet and lifestyle, individuals with Lupus can continue to live their life as they wish.


If you feel as though you are ready to see how much diet and lifestyle can improve your symptoms, reach out to me today!



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